Sarsfield DD-837 - History

Sarsfield DD-837 - History


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Sarsfield DD-837

Sarsfield(DD-837: dp. 2,425; 1. 390'6"; b. 41'1", dr. 18'6", s. 35 k.; cpl. 367; a. 6 5", 12 40mm., 5 20mm., 10 21"tt.; cl. Gearing)Sarsfield ( DD-837) was laid down on 15 January 1945 by the Bath Iron Works Co., Bath, Me., launched on 27 May 1945, sponsored by Mrs. Eugene S. Sarsfield, and commissioned at Boston Naval Shipyard on 31 July 1945, Comdr. Hepburn A. Pierce in command.After completion of her fitting-out, Sarsfield sailed on 24 August, for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and shakedown training. She returned to Boston on 30 September and, after post shakedown alterations, got underway, on 25 October, for New York and the Navy Day celebration. Following her stay at New York, she participated in training exercises in the Chesapeake Bay— Virginia Capes area until 13 December, when she entered the Brooklyn Navy Yard for installation of some experimental equipment.On 1 February 1946, Sarsfield sailed from New York bound for Key West, Florida. She arrived in Key West on 4 February to begin two decades with the Operational Development Force located there. Attached to the Surface Antisubmarine Development Detachment, Atlantic Fleet, she participated in the testing and evaluation of new weapons and equipment and made periodic training cruises in the Caribbean and in the Gulf of Mexico. In addition to the work she did for the Operational Development Force, Sarsfield also served the Naval Mine Countermeasures Station at Panama City, Fla., from 9 to 14 February 1947, conducted operations for the Underwater Sound Laboratory at New London, Conn., from 3 September 1953 until 18 October 1954, and operated out of Newport, R.I., between 8 July and 4 August 1955.In 1956, she embarked VIP's for ASW demonstrations out of Key West and, in 1957, underwent overhaul at the Norfolk Navy Yard. On 6 February 1958, she joined units of Escort Squadron 14 at Charleston S.C., for antisubmarine exercises. Following a cruise as plane guard to carrier, Leyte (CV-32), in early 1958, she returned to the Operational Development Force at Key West on 15 February. In the fall of 1958, Sarsfield entered Charleston Naval Shipyard for another overhaul. She departed Charleston on 5 January 1959 and conducted five weeks of refresher training out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, after which she returned to Key West and further experimental work.This employment, testing antisubmarine detection and destruction devices, continued until January 1961 when she was deployed, with shore bombardment responsibilities, to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Later that year, in June, Caribbean unrest again required the Navy to deploy ships. Sarsfield cruised off the coast of Hispaniola. In September 1961, Sarsfield took station in the Atlantic as a recovery ship for Project Mercury, the manned space flight program then in progress.In January 1962, she again took station for Project Mercury, this time off the coast of Africa. In August, she entered Boston Naval Shipyard for almost a year of Fleet Rehabilitation and Modernization ( FRAM ) overhaul. Before leaving Boston, in June 1963, she received several new weapons systems, including ASROC, DASH, long-range, distant air search radar and long range sonar. From Boston, she sailed to Guantanamo Bay for refresher training; then, to Charleston for another six months of weapons and sonar modifications. At the completion of these latest alterations, she cruised the Caribbean and then returned to Key West and the Operational Test and Evaluation Detachment. This employment continued until 1966. On 15 July, she again commenced overhaul including still more sonar and radar changes.The overhaul was completed on 30 January 1967 and, by 7 February, she was back in Key West. Sarsfield spent the remainder of the month engaged in refresher training out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. In April, she joined Forrestal (CVA-59) for ASW exercises; then, returned to Key West on 1 May to operate with the Fleet Sonar School. June and July were occupied by fleet exercises and NATO exercise, "Lashout." On 21 September, Sarsfield departed Key West for the Mediterranean and, on 17 December, returned home.In early 1968, she operated off the Virginia Capes and in the Caribbean. In July 1968, she deployed to the Middle East. She called at many exotic ports on her voyage along the coasts of Africa and the Indian Ocean littoral. While on this tour of duty! Sarsfield also had the unique opportunity to participate in a spontaneous exercise with units of the Imperial Ethiopian Navy and the French Air Force. By 30 December, she was underway for the western hemisphere and, on 10 January 1969, arrived in Mayport, Fla.Sarsfield remained in the western hemisphere for all of 1969 and 1970. During the first seven months of 1969, she resumed Caribbean and Atlantic operations. On 28 July she commenced UNITAS X, an exercise involving elements of the United States, Brazilian, Argentine, Colombian, Chilean, Ecuadorian, Peruvian, Venezuelan and Urguayan navies. In December, upon the completion of this exercise, during which she visited ports in all the countries named, Sarsfield returned to Mayport to prepare for overhaul. From January to June 1970, she was at Charleston, S.C. undergoing overhaul. In June, she commenced eight weeks of refresher training out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba; and, upon completing it, returned to local operations out of Mayport for the rest of the year.In January 1971, Sarsfield again deployed to the Middle East, entering the Indian Ocean in February. By 29 June, she was back at Mayport and resumed normal operations for the rest of 1971 and for the first three months of 1972.On 13 April 1972, she got underway for an entirely different deployment. Proceeding via the Panama Canal, she arrived in Subic Bay, P.I., on 11 May. Throughout the summer, Sarsfield plied the waters of the Gulf of Tonkin, first as plane guard for Saratoga (CV-60), then, patrolling off Hainan Island. She also participated in shore bombardment missions. She departed the gunline on 12 September; stopped at Hong Kong for six days of liberty (15 to 21 September) and at Yokosuka, Japan, for four days (25 to 29 September); and then, got underway to return to the United States.She entered San Diego on 13 October, transited the Panama Canal on 21 October, and reentered Mayport on the 25th. Upon her return, she resumed local operations out of Mayport. This employment continued until 29 May 1973, when she weighed anchor to join the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean.She sailed with the 6th Fleet until 22 September, when she passed through the Straits of Gibraltar to join NATO units in exercises in the Bay of Biscay and in the North Sea. On 10 October, she entered the Firth of Forth and, the next day, berthed at Edinburgh,Scotland. Two days later, at the outbreak of the ArabIsraeli War, she departed Scotland to reenter the Mediterranean with John F. Kennedy (CVA-67) and sped to the eastern end of that sea. After more than a month of uncertainty, Sarsfield put into Athens Greece, on 14 November for a five-day tender and leave period.On 18 November, she was ordered to rejoin John F. Kennedy for the voyage back to the United States. She arrived at Mayport on 1 December and spent the rest of 1973 in a standdown and leave status. She remained in port at Mayport until May 1974 at which time she resumed Atlantic seaboard operations. As of July 1974 Sarsfield is in port at Mayport.Sarsfield earned one battle star for service in the Vietnam War.


Sarsfield DD-837 - History

Te Yang (DDG-925)
Former USS Sarsfield (DD-837)

International Call Sign: Bravo-Charlie-Juliett-Bravo

Te Yang is a Gearing-class destroyer laid down as USS Sarsfield (DD-837) at Bath Iron Works Co., Bath, ME on January 15. 1945. Sarsfield was named after Eugene S. Sarsfield, an officer and commander of the Maddox. He disappeared after the sinking of his ship and was presumed dead on 11 July 1943. She was launched on May 27, 1945, sponsored by Mrs. Eugene S. Sarsfield and commissioned at Boston Naval Shipyard on 31 July 1945, with Commander Hepburn A. Pierce in command.

After the ship's fitting-out was complete, it sailed on 24 August, for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and shakedown training. She returned to Boston on 30 September and, after post-shakedown alterations, got underway, on 25 October, for New York City and the Navy Day celebration. Following her stay at New York, she participated in training exercises in the Chesapeake Bay-Virginia Capes area until 13 December, when she entered the Brooklyn Navy Yard for installation of some experimental equipment.

On 1 February 1946, Sarsfield sailed from New York bound for Key West, Florida. She arrived in Key West on 4 February to begin two decades with the Operational Development Force located there. Attached to the Surface Antisubmarine Development Detachment, Atlantic Fleet, she participated in the testing and evaluation of new weapons and equipment and made periodic training cruises in the Caribbean and in the Gulf of Mexico. In 1950, the ship helped the new Eastern Test Range out of Cape Canaveral test two U.S. Army Bumpers, which were German V-2 rockets modified to carry an upper stage. Sarsfield was stationed a mile or two from shore for the first, 48-mile Bumper launch, and tracked it with its Mk.25 fire director, which provided radar and optical tracking.

In addition to the work she did for the Operational Development Force, Sarsfield also served the Naval Mine Countermeasures Station at Panama City, Florida, from 9 to 14 February 1947 conducted operations for the Underwater Sound Laboratory at New London, Connecticut, from 3 September 1953 until 18 October 1954 and operated out of Newport, Rhode Island, between 8 July and 4 August 1955.

In 1956, she embarked VIPs for ASW demonstrations out of Key West and, in 1957, underwent overhaul at the Norfolk Navy Yard. On 6 February 1958, she joined units of Escort Squadron 14 at Charleston, South Carolina, for anti-submarine exercises. Following a cruise as plane guard to carrier Leyte (CV-32) in early 1958, she returned to the Operational Development Force at Key West on 15 February. In the fall of 1958, Sarsfield entered Charleston Naval Shipyard for another overhaul. She departed Charleston on 5 January 1959 and conducted five weeks of refresher training out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, after which she returned to Key West and further experimental work.
This employment, testing antisubmarine detection and destruction devices, continued until January 1961, when she was deployed, with shore bombardment responsibilities, to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Later that year, in June, Caribbean unrest again required the Navy to deploy ships. Sarsfield cruised off the coast of Hispaniola. In September 1961, Sarsfield took station in the Atlantic as a recovery ship for Project Mercury, the manned space flight program.

In January 1962, she again took station for Project Mercury, this time off the coast of Africa. In August, she entered Boston Naval Shipyard for almost a year of Fleet Rehabilitation and Modernization (FRAM) overhaul. Before leaving Boston, in June 1963, she received several new weapons systems, including ASROC, DASH, long-range, distant air search radar and long-range sonar. From Boston, she sailed to Guantanamo Bay for refresher training then, to Charleston for another six months of weapons and sonar modifications. At the completion of these latest alterations, she cruised the Caribbean and then returned to Key West and the Operational Test and Evaluation Detachment. This employment continued until 1966. On 15 July, she again commenced overhaul, including still more sonar and radar changes.

The overhaul was completed on 30 January 1967 and, by 7 February, she was back in Key West. Sarsfield spent the remainder of the month engaged in refresher training out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. In April, she joined Forrestal (CVA-59) for ASW exercises then, returned to Key West on 1 May to operate with the Fleet Sonar School. June and July were occupied by fleet exercises and NATO exercise, "Lashout". On 21 September, Sarsfield departed Key West for the Mediterranean and, on 17 December, returned home.

In early 1968, she operated off the Virginia Capes and in the Caribbean. In July 1968, she deployed to the Middle East. She called at many exotic ports on her voyage along the coasts of Africa and the Indian Ocean littoral. While on this tour of duty, Sarsfield also had the unique opportunity to participate in a spontaneous exercise with units of the Imperial Ethiopian Navy and the French Air Force. By 30 December, she was underway for the western hemisphere and, on 10 January 1969, arrived in Mayport, Florida.

Sarsfield remained in the western hemisphere for all of 1969 and 1970. During the first seven months of 1969, she resumed Caribbean and Atlantic operations. On 28 July, she commenced UNITAS X, an exercise involving elements of the United States, Brazilian, Argentine, Colombian, Chilean, Ecuadorian, Peruvian, Venezuelan and Uruguayan navies. In December, upon the completion of this exercise, during which she visited ports in all the countries named, Sarsfield returned to Mayport to prepare for overhaul.
From January to June 1970, she was at Charleston, South Carolina, undergoing overhaul. In June, she commenced eight weeks of refresher training out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and, upon completing it, returned to local operations out of Mayport for the rest of the year.

In January 1971, Sarsfield again deployed to the Middle East, entering the Indian Ocean in February. Tensions were rising in the region the Bangladesh Liberation War broke out in March and led to the war between India and Pakistan in December. By 29 June, she was back at Mayport and resumed normal operations for the rest of 1971 and for the first three months of 1972.

On 13 April 1972, she got underway for an entirely different deployment. Proceeding via the Panama Canal, she arrived in Subic Bay, Philippines, on 11 May. Throughout the summer, Sarsfield plied the waters of the Gulf of Tonkin, first as plane guard for Saratoga (CV-60), then, patrolling off Hainan Island. She also participated in shore bombardment missions. She departed the gunline on 12 September stopped at Hong Kong for six days of liberty (15 to 21 September) and at Yokosuka, Japan, for four days (25 to 29 September) and then, got underway to return to the United States.

She entered San Diego on 13 October, transited the Panama Canal on 21 October, and reentered Mayport on the 25th. Upon her return, she resumed local operations out of Mayport. This employment continued until 29 May 1973, when she weighed anchor to join the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean.

She sailed with the 6th Fleet until 22 September, when she passed through the Straits of Gibraltar to join NATO units in exercises in the Bay of Biscay and in the North Sea. On 10 October, she entered the Firth of Forth and, the next day, berthed at Edinburgh, Scotland. Two days later, at the outbreak of the Arab-Israeli War, she departed Scotland to reenter the Mediterranean with John F. Kennedy (CVA-67) and sped to the eastern end of that sea. After more than a month of uncertainty, Sarsfield put into Athens, Greece, on 14 November for a five-day tender and leave period.

On 18 November, she was ordered to rejoin John F. Kennedy for the voyage back to the United States. She arrived at Mayport on 1 December and spent the rest of 1973 in a standdown and leave status. She remained in port at Mayport, Florida until May 1974 at which time she resumed Atlantic seaboard operations.

On 14 June 1974, in protest of perceived racism on the part of the command, nearly all of the ship's minority sailors occupied the fantail and refused orders to handle lines while Sarsfield was attempting a difficult mooring in an off-setting wind at the Charleston Naval Station. After being surrounded by the ship's Master-at-Arms force and being individually ordered by the Executive Officer, most of the demonstrating sailors returned to their quarters. Seven of them, however, refused to leave the quarterdeck despite direct orders to do so, and eventually left the ship without authority to do so. The seven sailors were eventually apprehended and originally charged with, among other things, mutiny. They were all eventually convicted of lesser charges in a joint General Courts Martial at NAS Jacksonville, Florida.

In the fall of 1974, Sarsfield departed Mayport, Florida to participate in Northern Merger with NATO units, and enjoyed port visits in Plymouth, England and Edinburgh, Scotland, as well as Lubeck, West Germany.

Sarsfield deployed on a Med cruise from July 27, 1975 to January 27, 1976, and enjoyed port visits in Gibraltar, BCC, Barcelona, Valencia, Rota and Algeciras, Spain, Siracusa and Taormina, Sicily, Naples, Italy, Palma, Mallorca, as well as Athens, and after transiting the Bosporus and Dardanelles, steamed in company with the USS Belknap in the Black Sea.

The year 1976 saw gunnery practice in Chesapeake Bay, and a short shipyard period in Charleston, South Carolina. Winter of 1976-1977 was the ship's last deployment to the Mediterranean as part of the Franklin D. Roosevelt (CV-42) task force. Port visits included Rota, Spain Naples, Italy Trapani, Sicily (helping the city recover from a flood) Kalamata, Greece (American-style hamburger cookout at the local orphanage at Christmas) Sfax, Tunisia Palma and Morocco. She anchored off the coast of Egypt with dozens of Russian ships and monitored Russian submarine operations as well as extensive operations as part of Roosevelt's group. On return to the United States, many Taiwanese sailors joined the crew to learn ship operations before Sarsfield was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 1 October 1977. On the same day she was transferred to the Republic of China (Taiwan).

On October 1 1977, MR.Huang Guan Teng(黃冠騰)(ROC Navy Sonar Chief warrant officer at the time), participated in the ceremony in which USS Sarsfield (DD-837) was officially transferred to the ROC Navy at he Mayport Navy Base, Jacksonville, FL.
She left for Taiwan in 1978, together with ROCS Shen Yang (DDG-923), the former American Gearing-class destroyer USS Power (DD-839), on a 13,000 mile trip through the Panama Canal, via Long Beach, Pearl Harbor, Midway and Guam.

In 1989 she was overhauled and redesignated DDG-925, and after 28 years of service to Taiwan, she was decommissioned on 1 April 2005 at Kaohsiung.

Due to Mr. Hsu Tain-tsair's (15th mayor of Tainan City) relentles efforts, Te Yang was saved from the breakers and brought to Tainan's Anping Harbor, where she became a military museum with educational significance.

According to Mr. Hsu Tain-tsair, Anping Harbor is a important part of Taiwan's founding and history, an important place for Taiwan's military affairs and a key stronghold of world trade. Therefore the decommissioned Navy destroyer Te Yang, displayed in Anping Harbor represents culture rather than military.


Biography

Sarsfield was born in Brooklyn, New York, on 19 April 1902 and entered the United States Naval Academy in 1922. Upon his graduation on 3 June 1926, he was commissioned Ensign and served in Nevada (BB-36), New York (BB-34), and Hannibal (AG-1) before receiving submarine instruction in 1929 and torpedo training in 1930. During the next four years, he served successively in Greer (DD-145), Argonne (AP-4), and Constitution.

Following duty with the 3d Naval District, he joined Badger (DD-126) in July 1935, and returned to New York in September 1937. He instructed naval reservists in the 3d Naval District for two years before reporting to Kearny (DD-432) on 10 June 1940 to serve as executive officer and navigator. He was commended by the Secretary of the Navy, Frank Knox, for "Leadership, personal courage and ingenuity in solving the many problems arising under adverse conditions" when Kearny was torpedoed off Iceland on 17 October 1941.

Given command of McCormick (DD-223) on 8 December 1941, he was detached on 3 October to supervise the outfitting of Maddox (DD-622) and he assumed command of that destroyer at her commissioning on 31 October 1942.

  • 1926-1929: USS Nevada (BB-36)
  • 1926-1929: USS New York (BB-34)
  • 1929-1929: Submarine School (diesel)
  • 1930-1930: Torpedo Training Center (Faculty Staff)
  • 1930-1934: USS Argonne (AP-4)
  • 1931-1934: USS Greer (DD-145)
  • 1931-1935: USS Constitution (Old Ironsides)
  • 1935-1937: USS Badger (DD-126)
  • 1937-1939: New York
  • 1940-1941: USS Kearny (DD-432)
  • 1941-1941: USS Mccormick (DD-223)
  • 1942-1943: USS Maddox (DD-622)

Contents

Initial operations, 1945–1959

After the ship's fitting-out was complete, it sailed on 24 August, for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and shakedown training. She returned to Boston on 30 September and, after post-shakedown alterations, got underway, on 25 October, for New York and the Navy Day celebration. Following her stay at New York, she participated in training exercises in the Chesapeake Bay-Virginia Capes area until 13 December, when she entered the Brooklyn Navy Yard for installation of some experimental equipment.

On 1 February 1946, Sarsfield sailed from New York bound for Key West, Florida. She arrived in Key West on 4 February to begin two decades with the Operational Development Force located there. Attached to the Surface Antisubmarine Development Detachment, Atlantic Fleet, she participated in the testing and evaluation of new weapons and equipment and made periodic training cruises in the Caribbean and in the Gulf of Mexico. In 1950, the ship helped the new Eastern Test Range out of Cape Canaveral test two U.S. Army Bumpers, which were German V-2 rockets modified to carry an upper stage. Sarsfield was stationed a mile or two from shore for the first, 48-mile Bumper launch, and tracked it with its Mk.25 fire director, which provided radar and optical tracking. [1]

In addition to the work she did for the Operational Development Force, Sarsfield also served the Naval Mine Countermeasures Station at Panama City, Florida, from 9 to 14 February 1947 conducted operations for the Underwater Sound Laboratory at New London, Connecticut, from 3 September 1953 until 18 October 1954 and operated out of Newport, Rhode Island, between 8 July and 4 August 1955.

In 1956, she embarked VIPs for ASW demonstrations out of Key West and, in 1957, underwent overhaul at the Norfolk Navy Yard. On 6 February 1958, she joined units of Escort Squadron 14 at Charleston, South Carolina, for anti-submarine exercises. Following a cruise as plane guard to carrier Leyte (CV-32) in early 1958, she returned to the Operational Development Force at Key West on 15 February. In the fall of 1958, Sarsfield entered Charleston Naval Shipyard for another overhaul. She departed Charleston on 5 January 1959 and conducted five weeks of refresher training out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, after which she returned to Key West and further experimental work.

1960–1969

This employment, testing antisubmarine detection and destruction devices, continued until January 1961, when she was deployed, with shore bombardment responsibilities, to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Later that year, in June, Caribbean unrest again required the Navy to deploy ships. Sarsfield cruised off the coast of Hispaniola. In September 1961, Sarsfield took station in the Atlantic as a recovery ship for Project Mercury, the manned space flight program.

In January 1962, she again took station for Project Mercury, this time off the coast of Africa. In August, she entered Boston Naval Shipyard for almost a year of Fleet Rehabilitation and Modernization (FRAM) overhaul. Before leaving Boston, in June 1963, she received several new weapons systems, including ASROC, DASH, long-range, distant air search radar and long-range sonar. From Boston, she sailed to Guantanamo Bay for refresher training then, to Charleston for another six months of weapons and sonar modifications. At the completion of these latest alterations, she cruised the Caribbean and then returned to Key West and the Operational Test and Evaluation Detachment. This employment continued until 1966. On 15 July, she again commenced overhaul, including still more sonar and radar changes.

The overhaul was completed on 30 January 1967 and, by 7 February, she was back in Key West. Sarsfield spent the remainder of the month engaged in refresher training out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. In April, she joined Forrestal (CVA-59) for ASW exercises then, returned to Key West on 1 May to operate with the Fleet Sonar School. June and July were occupied by fleet exercises and NATO exercise, "Lashout". On 21 September, Sarsfield departed Key West for the Mediterranean and, on 17 December, returned home.

In early 1968, she operated off the Virginia Capes and in the Caribbean. In July 1968, she deployed to the Middle East. She called at many exotic ports on her voyage along the coasts of Africa and the Indian Ocean littoral. While on this tour of duty, Sarsfield also had the unique opportunity to participate in a spontaneous exercise with units of the Imperial Ethiopian Navy and the French Air Force. By 30 December, she was underway for the western hemisphere and, on 10 January 1969, arrived in Mayport, Florida.

Sarsfield remained in the western hemisphere for all of 1969 and 1970. During the first seven months of 1969, she resumed Caribbean and Atlantic operations. On 28 July, she commenced UNITAS X, an exercise involving elements of the United States, Brazilian, Argentine, Colombian, Chilean, Ecuadorian, Peruvian, Venezuelan and Uruguayan navies. In December, upon the completion of this exercise, during which she visited ports in all the countries named, Sarsfield returned to Mayport to prepare for overhaul.

1970–1977

From January to June 1970, she was at Charleston, South Carolina, undergoing overhaul. In June, she commenced eight weeks of refresher training out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and, upon completing it, returned to local operations out of Mayport for the rest of the year.

In January 1971, Sarsfield again deployed to the Middle East, entering the Indian Ocean in February. Tensions were rising in the region the Bangladesh Liberation War broke out in March and led to the war between India and Pakistan in December. By 29 June, she was back at Mayport and resumed normal operations for the rest of 1971 and for the first three months of 1972.

On 13 April 1972, she got underway for an entirely different deployment. Proceeding via the Panama Canal, she arrived in Subic Bay, Philippines, on 11 May. Throughout the summer, Sarsfield plied the waters of the Gulf of Tonkin, first as plane guard for Saratoga (CV-60), then, patrolling off Hainan Island. She also participated in shore bombardment missions. She departed the gunline on 12 September stopped at Hong Kong for six days of liberty (15 to 21 September) and at Yokosuka, Japan, for four days (25 to 29 September) and then, got underway to return to the United States.

She entered San Diego on 13 October, transited the Panama Canal on 21 October, and reentered Mayport on the 25th. Upon her return, she resumed local operations out of Mayport. This employment continued until 29 May 1973, when she weighed anchor to join the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean.

She sailed with the 6th Fleet until 22 September, when she passed through the Straits of Gibraltar to join NATO units in exercises in the Bay of Biscay and in the North Sea. On 10 October, she entered the Firth of Forth and, the next day, berthed at Edinburgh, Scotland. Two days later, at the outbreak of the Arab-Israeli War, she departed Scotland to reenter the Mediterranean with John F. Kennedy (CVA-67) and sped to the eastern end of that sea. After more than a month of uncertainty, Sarsfield put into Athens, Greece, on 14 November for a five-day tender and leave period.

On 18 November, she was ordered to rejoin John F. Kennedy for the voyage back to the United States. She arrived at Mayport on 1 December and spent the rest of 1973 in a standdown and leave status. She remained in port at Mayport, Florida until May 1974 at which time she resumed Atlantic seaboard operations.

The year 1976 saw gunnery practice in Chesapeake Bay, and a short shipyard period in Charleston, South Carolina. Winter of 1976-1977 was the ship's last deployment to the Mediterranean as part of the Franklin D. Roosevelt (CV-42) task force. Port visits included Rota, Spain Naples, Italy Trapani, Sicily (helping the city recover from a flood) Kalamata, Greece (American-style hamburger cookout at the local orphanage at Christmas) Sfax, Tunisa Palma and Morocco. She anchored off the coast of Egypt with dozens of Russian ships and monitored Russian submarine operations as well as extensive operations as part of Roosevelt ' s group. On return to the United States, many Taiwanese sailors joined the crew to learn ship operations before Sarsfield was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 1 October 1977. On the same day she was transferred to the Republic of China (Taiwan).


History of the McCaffery - 1968

On 1 January 1968, McCaffery was moored at Mayport, Florida. Commanding Officer - CDR W.W. Jordan, Jr.

McCaffery remained moored at Mayport for the month of January. On 9 February, she got underway for San Juan, Puerto Rico. McCaffery conducted exercises in the San Juan area through 22 February, and visited various ports in the Carribean. She returned to Mayport on 26 February.

On 5 March, McCaffery transferred two DASH drones to Yellowstone (AD-27). On 8 March, McCaffery got underway for Cape Kennedy with several guests from the USO, St. Augustine, Florida. While underway for Cape Kennedy, a general alarm was sounded due to a problem with the gyro. On 9 March, McCaffery arrived at Cape Kennedy, remained moored there until 26 March, and then returned to Mayport.

On 1 May, McCaffery got underway for a special operation at Port Canaveral, Florida, and returned to Mayport on 3 May. On 4 May, eighteen inches of water was discovered in the main hedgehog projectile magazine. The water was leaking from a fire main in an adjacent compartment, and repaired. On 15 May, Captain D.B. Bryan, senior member, U.S. Naval Sub-board of Inspection and Survey, Charleston, S.C., came aboard for inspection. McCaffery remained moored in Mayport, shifting berths several times. On 1 June, McCaffery got underway for the overnight voyage to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to serve as gun support ship and plane guard for Forrestal (CVA-59). During the midwatch, McCaffery conducted a bathythermograph drop. Results were good. Operating out of Guantanamo Bay, McCaffery conducted various exercises until 12 June. With Forrestal, she then began the voyage to Mayport, arrived on 16 June, and moored alongside Sarsfield (DD-837). The Roosevelt (CVA-42) was also present at Mayport.

McCaffery remained at Mayport through July and August. On 11 September, McCaffery got underway for the Charleston Naval Shipyard, S.C. On 14 September, two class "C" fires were reported in the ship's laundry and the shore power connection box. Both fires were controlled. On 21 October, McCaffery entered dry dock to repair two small leaks, and returned to moor at a pier. On 27 November, inspection of welds in the forward engine room was performed by technicians using an Iridium 192 Radiography source. Gamma radiography has the capability to identify flaws in welded joints as well as to indicate structural anomalies due to corrosion or mechanical damage. (Results of this examination are unknown.)

On 31 December 1968, McCaffery was moored at the Charleston Naval Shipyard.


USS SARSFIELD DD-837 Framed Navy Ship Display

This is a beautiful ship display commemorating the USS SARSFIELD (DD-837). The artwork depicts the USS SARSFIELD in all her glory. More than just an artistic concept of the ship, this display includes a custom designed ship crest plaque and an engraved ship statistics plaque. This product is richly finished with custom cut and sized double mats and framed with a high quality black frame. Only the best materials are used to complete our ship displays. Navy Emporium Ship Displays make a generous and personal gift for any Navy sailor.

  • Custom designed and expertly engraved Navy crest positioned on fine black felt
  • Artwork is 16 inches X 7 inches on heavyweight matte
  • Engraved plaque stating the ship vital statistics
  • Enclosed in a high quality 20 inch X 16 inch black frame
  • Choice of matting color options

PLEASE VIEW OUR OTHER GREAT USS SARSFIELD DD-837 INFORMATION:
USS Sarsfield DD-837 Guestbook Forum


Mục lục

Sarsfield được đặt lườn tại xưởng tàu của hãng Bath Iron Works Co. ở Bath, Maine vào ngày 15 tháng 1 năm 1945. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 27 tháng 5 năm 1945 được đỡ đầu bởi bà Eugene S. Sarsfield, vợ góa Trung tá Sarsfield, và nhập biên chế tại Xưởng hải quân Boston vào ngày 31 tháng 7 năm 1945 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Trung tá Hải quân Hepburn A. Pierce. [1]

1945 - 1959 Sửa đổi

Sau khi hoàn tất việc trang bị, Sarsfield khởi hành vào ngày 24 tháng 8 năm 1945, đi đến khu vực vịnh Guantánamo, Cuba để chạy thử máy huấn luyện. Nó quay trở về Boston, Massachusetts vào ngày 30 tháng 9, và sau khi hoàn tất việc sửa chữa sau chạy thử máy, nó lên đường đi New York vào ngày 25 tháng 10, tham gia các lễ hội nhân ngày Hải quân tại đây. Sau đó nó tham gia các đợt thực tập huấn luyện tại khu vực vịnh Chesapeake - Virginia Capes cho đến ngày 13 tháng 12, khi nó đi vào Xưởng hải quân Brooklyn để được trang bị một số thiết bị thử nghiệm. [1]

Vào ngày 1 tháng 2 năm 1946, Sarsfield khởi hành từ New York để đi Key West, Florida, đến nơi vào ngày 4 tháng 2, nơi nó sẽ hoạt động trong hai thập niên tiếp theo cùng Lực lượng Thử nghiệm và Đánh giá Tác chiến. Được phân về nhóm Phát triển Tác chiến chống ngầm thuộc Hạm đội Đại Tây Dương, nó tham gia thử nghiệm và phát triển những thiết bị và vũ khí mới, đồng thời thực hiện những chuyến đi huấn luyện đến vùng biển Caribe và vịnh Mexico. Nó cũng phục vụ cùng Căn cứ Đối phó Thủy lôi Hải quân tại Panama City, Florida từ ngày 9 đến ngày 14 tháng 2 năm 1947 cùng Phòng thí nghiệm Thủy âm tại New London, Connecticut từ ngày 3 tháng 9 năm 1953 đến ngày 18 tháng 10 năm 1954 và hoạt động từ căn cứ Newport, Rhode Island từ ngày 8 tháng 7 đến ngày 4 tháng 8 năm 1955. [1]

Sarsfield đi đến ngoài khơi mũi Canaveral, Florida hỗ trợ cho Khu vực Thử nghiệm phía Đông trong việc thử nghiệm hai tên lửa RTV-G-4 Bumber của Lục quân, một phiên bản cải tiến từ kiểu tên lửa V-2 của Đức được bổ sung thêm một tầng thứ hai. Chiếc tàu khu trục đã được bố trí ngoài khơi bãi thử nghiệm, và theo dõi đường đi của tên lửa khi nó được phóng để cung cấp các dữ liệu radar và hình ảnh. [2]

Trong năm 1956, Sarsfield đón lên tàu những vị khách quan trọng cho một đợt trình diễn tác chiến chống tàu ngầm ngoài khơi Key West và đến năm 1957 nó được đại tu tại Xưởng hải quân Norfolk. Vào ngày 6 tháng 2 năm 1958, nó tham gia cùng Hải đội Hộ tống 14 tại Charleston, South Carolina để thực tập chống tàu ngầm. Sau một chuyến đi phục vụ canh phòng máy bay cho tàu sân bay Leyte (CV-32) vào đầu năm 1958, nó quay trở lại hoạt động cùng Lực lượng Thử nghiệm và Đánh giá Tác chiến tại Key West vào ngày 15 tháng 2. Vào mùa Thu năm 1958, nó đi vào Xưởng hải quân Charleston để đại tu, rồi rời Charleston vào ngày 5 tháng 1 năm 1959 cho một đợt huấn luyện ôn tập kéo dài năm tuần lễ tại khu vực vịnh Guantánamo, Cuba. Sau khi hoàn tất, nó quay trở lại Key West tiếp tục các hoạt động thử nghiệm. [1]

1960 - 1969 Sửa đổi

Nhịp điệu hoạt động thực hành và thử nghiệm đánh giá này được tiếp tục cho đến ngày tháng 1 năm 1961, khi Sarsfield lên đường đi vịnh Guantánamo, Cuba để thực hành tác xạ. Đến tháng 6, tình trạng bất ổn tại Cộng hòa Dominica sau khi nhà độc tài Rafael Trujillo bị ám sát khiến chiếc tàu khu trục lại được phái đi tuần tra tại vùng bờ biển ngoài khơi đảo Hispaniola. Sang tháng 9, nó tham gia vào Chương trình Mercury khi phục vụ cho việc thu hồi tàu không gian Mercury-Atlas 4 tại Đại Tây Dương và đến tháng 1 năm 1962 nó lại tham gia một hoạt động thu hồi tàu không gian khác ngoài khơi bờ biển Châu Phi. [1]

Vào tháng 8, 1962, Sarsfield đi đến Xưởng hải quân Boston để được nâng cấp trong khuôn khổ Chương trình Hồi sinh và Hiện đại hóa Hạm đội (FRAM: Fleet Rehabilitation and Modernization), nơi nó được sửa chữa và nâng cấp để kéo dài vòng đời hoạt động thêm 10 đến 20 năm, đồng thời nâng cao năng lực tác chiến. Nó rời xưởng tàu vào tháng 6, 1963 với những thiết bị điện tử, radar và sonar hiện đại, trang bị thêm tên lửa chống ngầm RUR-5 ASROC, cùng hầm chứa và sàn đáp để vận hành máy bay trực thăng không người lái chống tàu ngầm Gyrodyne QH-50 DASH. Nó rời Boston để huấn luyện ôn tập tại khu vực vịnh Guantánamo, Cuba, rồi tiếp tục được tái trang bị tại Charleston để cải tiến sonar và vũ khí trước khi quay trở lại Key West tiếp tục hoạt động cùng Lực lượng Thử nghiệm và Đánh giá Tác chiến cho đến năm 1966. Con tàu được đại tu từ ngày 15 tháng 7, bao gồm việc cải tiến thiết bị radar và sonar. [1]

Hoàn tất việc đại tu vào ngày 30 tháng 1, 1967, Sarsfield quay trở lại Key West vào ngày 7 tháng 2, và tiến hành huấn luyện ôn tập tại khu vực vịnh Guantánamo, Cuba. Sang tháng 4, nó cùng tàu sân bay Forrestal (CVA-59) tiến hành tập trận chống tàu ngầm, rồi quay trở lại Key West vào ngày 1 tháng 5 để hoạt động cùng Trường Sonar Hạm đội. Đến tháng 6 và tháng 7, nó tham gia cuộc Tập trận "Lashout" của Khối NATO, rồi khởi hành từ Key West vào ngày 21 tháng 9 để đi sang hoạt động tại Địa Trung Hải, rồi quay trở về nhà vào ngày 17 tháng 12. [1]

Vào đầu năm 1968, Sarsfield hoạt động ngoài khơi Virginia Capes và tại vùng biển Caribe. Nó được phái sang Trung Đông vào tháng 7, viếng thăm nhiều cảng dọc bờ biển Châu Phi và tại Ấn Độ Dương, và đã có dịp tham gia tập trận cùng các đơn vị Hải quân Ethiopia và Không quân Pháp. Nó lên đường quay trở về nhà vào ngày 30 tháng 12, và về đến Mayport, Florida vào ngày 10 tháng 1, 1969. Cho đến năm 1970, nó tiếp tục ở lại vùng bờ Đông Hoa Kỳ, tiến hành các hoạt động huấn luyện và tập trận tại vùng bờ biển Đại Tây Dương và vùng biển Caribe. Vào ngày 28 tháng 7, 1969, nó tham gia cuộc Tập trận “Unitas X” phối hợp giữa hải quân Hoa Kỳ, Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, Chile, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela và Uruguay. Đến tháng 12, sau khi viếng thăm nhiều cảng tại Trung và Nam Mỹ, nó quay trở về Mayport để đại tu. [1]

1970 - 1977 Sửa đổi

Từ tháng 1 đến tháng 6, 1970, Sarsfield được đại tu tại Charleston, South Carolina, và sau khi hoàn tất nó hoạt động huấn luyện ôn tập tại khu vực vịnh Guantánamo, Cuba trong tám tuần lễ, rồi đi đến Mayport, Florida và ở lại đây cho đến hết năm đó. Vào tháng 1, 1971, nó được phái sang hoạt động tại khu vực Trung Đông, tiến vào Ấn Độ Dương trong tháng 2 trong bối cảnh căng thẳng trong khu vực Chiến tranh Giải phóng Bangladesh bùng nổ vào tháng 3 đã dẫn đến cuộc xung đột giữa Ấn Độ và Pakistan vào tháng 12. Con tàu quay trở về Mayport vào ngày 29 tháng 6, và tiếp tục hoạt động thường lệ cho đến đầu năm 1972. [1]

Sarsfield lên đường vào ngày 13 tháng 4, 1972 cho một nhiệm vụ khác. Nó băng qua kênh đào Panama và đi đến vịnh Subic, Philippines vào ngày 11 tháng 5. Trong suốt mùa Hè năm đó, nó hoạt động khắp vùng biển vịnh Bắc Bộ, thoạt tiên phục vụ canh phòng máy bay cho tàu sân bay Saratoga (CV-60), rồi tuần tra ngoài khơi đảo Hải Nam con tàu còn tham gia các hoạt động bắn phá bờ biển. Nó rời vùng chiến sự vào ngày 12 tháng 9, ghé qua Hong Kong trong sáu ngày để nghỉ ngơi từ ngày 15 đến ngày 21 tháng 9, rồi dừng lại cảng Yokosuka, Nhật Bản từ ngày 25 đến ngày 29 tháng 9 trong hành trình quay trở về Hoa Kỳ. Nó đến San Diego vào ngày 13 tháng 10, băng qua kênh đào Panama vào ngày 21 tháng 10, và về Mayport đến vào ngày 25 tháng 10. Chiếc tàu khu trục hoạt động tại chỗ từ cảng Mayport cho đến ngày 29 tháng 5, 1973, khi nó lên đường đi sang Địa Trung Hải để gia nhập Đệ Lục hạm đội. [1]

Sarsfield hoạt động cùng Đệ Lục hạm đội cho đến ngày 22 tháng 9, khi nó băng ngược qua eo biển Gibraltar để tham gia cuộc tập trận của Khối NATO trong vịnh và tại Bắc Hải. Nó đi đến Firth of Forth vào ngày 10 tháng 10, và sang ngày hôm sau đã thả neo tại Edinburgh, Scotland. Khi cuộc chiến tranh Ả Rập-Israel nổ ra hai ngày sau đó, nó rời vùng biển Scotland để tái gia nhập cùng tàu sân bay John F. Kennedy (CVA-67) tại Địa Trung Hải, và nhanh chóng đi sang khu vực Trung Đông. Sau hơn một tháng tuần tra đề phòng cuộc xung đột leo thang, nó ghé vào cảng Athens, Hy Lạp vào ngày 14 tháng 11, được tiếp liệu và nghỉ ngơi trong năm ngày. Con tàu được lệnh gia nhập trở lại cùng John F. Kennedy vào ngày 18 tháng 11 để quay trở về Hoa Kỳ. Nó về đến Mayport vào ngày 1 tháng 12, rồi trải qua thời gian còn lại của năm 1973 cho việc bảo trì và nghỉ ngơi, tiếp tục ở lại cảng cho đến tháng 5, 1974. [1]

Vào mùa Thu năm 1974, Sarsfield rời Mayport, Florida để tham gia cuộc Tập trận Northern Merger cùng các đơn vị trong Khối NATO sau đó nó viếng thăm Plymouth, Anh Edinburgh, Scotland và Lubeck, Cộng hòa Liên bang Đức. Từ ngày 27 tháng 7, 1975 đến ngày 27 tháng 1, 1976, con tàu lại được phái sang hoạt động tại khu vực Địa Trung Hải, và đã viếng thăm các cảng Gibraltar, Barcelona, Valencia, Rota và Algeciras, Tây Ban Nha cùng Siracusa và Taormina, Sicily Naples, Ý Palma de Mallorca và Athens. Nó cũng băng qua các eo biển Bosporus và Dardanellia, Thổ Nhĩ Kỳ để cùng tàu tuần dương USS Belknap hoạt động trong biển Hắc Hải. [1]

Trong năm 1976, Sarsfield tiếp tục thực hành huấn luyện tại khu vực vịnh Chesapeake, và trải qua một đợt bảo trì ngắn tại Charleston, South Carolina. Sang mùa Đông năm 1976-1977, nó thực hiện chuyến đi cuối cùng sang Địa Trung Hải trong thành phần đội đặc nhiệm tàu sân bay Franklin D. Roosevelt (CV-42). Nó viếng thăm các cảng Rota, Tây Ban Nha Naples, Ý Trapani, Sicily, nơi nó giúp thành phố sau một cơn lụt rồi tiếp tục viếng thăm Kalamata, Hy Lạp Sfax, Tunisia Palma de Mallorca và Morocco. Nó đã thả neo ngoài khơi bờ biển Ai Cập theo dõi hoạt động của những tàu ngầm Liên Xô cũng như tham gia các hoạt động của đội tàu sân bay Franklin D. Roosevelt. Trên đường quay trở về nhà, nhiều thủy thủ Đài Loan đã tham gia cùng thủy thủ đoàn để học hỏi hoạt động của con tàu trước khi được chuyển giao. Sarsfield được cho rút khỏi danh sách Đăng bạ Hải quân vào ngày 1 tháng 10, 1977, và được chuyển giao cho Đài Loan cùng ngày hôm đó. [1]

ROCS Te Yang (DDG-925) Sửa đổi

Con tàu tiếp tục phục vụ cùng Hải quân Trung Hoa dân quốc như là chiếc ROCS Te Yang (DDG-925). Nó ngừng hoạt động tại cảng Cao Hùng, Đài Loan vào ngày 1 tháng 4, 2005 rồi đến ngày 22 tháng 1, 2009 nó được kéo đến cảng An Bình, thành phố Đài Nam, nó được giữ lại như một tàu bảo tàng. [1] [3]


Sarsfield

The farming district of Sarsfield lies about 13 km north-east of Bairnsdale in East Gippsland. The Nicholson River flows from north to south through the fertile valley and the Omeo Highway passes through the area.

The Sarsfield district was part of the territory of the Brabralung tribe but by 1840, when Angus McMillan crossed the Nicholson River, their numbers had already dwindled. Lucknow pastoral run claimed the area west of the river in 1842 and Mibost run the area east of the river in 1855.

Gold was discovered in the Nicholson in 1854, and an accommodation house and hotel was built near the river crossing. The area was apparently named after General Patrick Sarsfield, a relative of the publican. Boats sailed up the river to the inn, bringing miners and supplies. When a bridge was constructed in 1859, a township was surveyed but few blocks were sold. However by the 1870s, much of the land in the district was settled. Mixed farming became the main activity, with crops of maize, chicory, tobacco and hops. A sawmill worked at Sarsfield and later sleepers were cut from the surrounding bush.

Another hotel was established near the new bridge built in 1871 and a school opened in 1873. When the Shire of Tambo was proclaimed in 1882, the Nicholson River formed a municipal boundary. By the late 1890s, the community also had a Presbyterian church and a hall. The population was boosted by a village settlement established in 1893. Although small, 11 blocks on 33 acres, the settlers grew vegetables, kept poultry and pigs and were able to find employment on surrounding farms. A creamery was established in the 1890s, encouraging dairying.

Sarsfield was a coach staging post on the route between Bairnsdale and Omeo, but up to the late 1890s the river provided a major means of transport. Maize and ti tree poles for the hop fields near Bairnsdale were shipped by steamer. Stone was quarried in the Sarsfield district for construction of the artificial entrance to the Gippsland Lakes. The Granite Rock Quarry, established in 1894, transported rock by tramline to the river. However by the late 1890s, hop crops declined due to insect damage, the rivers were silted and road transport had improved, so the river trade declined.

The Australian handbook described the settlement in 1903:

By the 1920s maize cropping, dairying and pig raising continued to be widespread, with some pea and bean crops, poultry farming and fruit growing. By the 1940s several large dairy herds supplied cream to the milk factory at Bairnsdale. Dairying flourished in the 1950s, with large areas of bush being cleared but by the 1960s a downturn in the industry favoured beef grazing.

During the 1950s Australian Paper Manufacturers obtained pulpwood from the area, mainly stringy bark from private properties. The company purchased a large area of bush and established a depot at Sarsfield but sold again in the 1960s. Pulpwood cutting ceased, but railway sleepers and power poles were also cut from the forest. After intermittent operation, the quarry began working again in the late 1980s, supplying road aggregate. The rock was also used for decorative purposes, being of an unusual soft pink colour.

Floods periodically afflict the valley, the worst being in 1893 and 1935. Bushfires also ravaged the district in 1939 and 1965, and a severe drought in the late 1960s caused the Nicholson River to cease flowing in 1968.

From the 1970s the district experienced population growth. Small allotments were subdivided and new homes also built on old subdivisions. Most of the new residents commute to Bairnsdale, and the township continued to decline. A Catholic church was built in 1922, but was moved to Paynesville in 1952 and the Presbyterian church (1897) was destroyed in the 1965 bushfire. The remaining hotel closed in 1965 and the school in 1992. A recreation reserve serves local sporting teams.

Census populations for the Sarsfield district have been:

area census date population
Sarsfield 1871 98
1901 182
1911 319
1933 217
1954 140
Sarsfield and environs 2006 617
2011 568


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Product Description

USS Sarsfield DD 837

"Personalized" Canvas Ship Print

(Not just a photo or poster but a work of art!)

Every sailor loved his ship. It was his life. Where he had tremendous responsibility and lived with his closest shipmates. As one gets older his appreciation for the ship and the Navy experience gets stronger. A personalized print shows ownership, accomplishment and an emotion that never goes away. It helps to show your pride even if a loved one is no longer with you. Every time you walk by the print you will feel the person or the Navy experience in your heart (guaranteed).

The image is portrayed on the waters of the ocean or bay with a display of her crest if available. The ships name is printed on the bottom of the print. What a great canvas print to commemorate yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her.

The printed picture is exactly as you see it. The canvas size is 8"x10" ready for framing as it is or you can add an additional matte of your own choosing. If you would like a larger picture size (11"x 14") on a 13" X 19" canvas simply purchase this print then prior to payment purchase additional services located in the store category (Home) to the left of this page. This option is an additional $12.00. The prints are made to order. They look awesome when matted and framed.

We PERSONALIZE the print with "Name, Rank and/or Years Served" or anything else you would like it to state (NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE). It is placed just above the ships photo. After purchasing the print simply email us or indicate in the notes section of your payment what you would like printed on it. Example:

United States Navy Sailor
YOUR NAME HERE
Proudly Served Sept 1963 - Sept 1967

This would make a nice gift and a great addition to any historic military collection. Would be fantastic for decorating the home or office wall.

The watermark "Great Naval Images" will NOT be on your print.

This photo is printed on Archival-Safe Acid-Free canvas using a high resolution printer and should last many years.

Because of its unique natural woven texture canvas offers a special and distinctive look that can only be captured on canvas. The canvas print does not need glass thereby enhancing the appearance of your print, eliminating glare and reducing your overall cost.

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Ballyneety

The battle of the Boyne was a curious affair. It has generated more potent myths than any other armed encounter in Ireland and has been ridiculously overplayed for partisan purposes. But, in truth, it was no great feat for 36,000 well-trained troops with up to forty field pieces to oust 25,000 who had only six small cannon. The terrain prevented the bulk of both armies from coming to grips with each other and the overall casualties were light. The Jacobites lost 1,000 men (4 per cent) and the Williamites, 5OO (1.4 per cent). The Jacobites withdrew towards Dublin in relatively good shape and next day made plans to rendezvous at Limerick.

The walls of Limerick

As a defensive location Limerick was problematic. It was a twin-city with the older part, the ‘English town’, built on an island bounded by the River Shannon and a small river called the Abbey. On the far side of the Abbey was the ‘Irish town’, linked to the northern half by a stone bridge and more vulnerable as it did not have a water frontage. Both towns were walled, but in many places the mortar had fallen away. The fortifications were medieval rather than seventeenth century: there were neither battlements on the walls nor ramparts on which to mount cannon. Vauban himself, it was said, would have had difficulty in fortifying Limerick.
But the Jacobites had a man familiar with the master’s methods, and who had actually rubbed shoulders with Vauban at Douai, Lille, Maastrict and elsewhere. This was Alexander Rainier, Marquis de Boisselleau he had participated in nine major sieges and was familiar with the latest techniques in siege warfare. He now assumed responsibility for strengthening Limerick under his instructions a ‘covered way’ was built outside the walls, consisting of a ditch protected by earthworks and a palisade which ran from the front of St John’s Gate to the East Watergate. Everything was done, however, in haste and some were unsure of the adequacy of the result. Lauzen, the senior French commander was unimpressed and declared, famously, that the walls of Limerick would collapse if pelted with roasted apples.

William of Orange by Jan Wyck. (Ulster Museum)

The defence of the city became even more problematic when he announced that he was withdrawing the French regiments to Galway, from where he intended to embark for France furthermore, he took some of the cannon and ammunition with him.

Sarsfield asserts himself

Tyrconnell, the Jacobite viceroy, was also sceptical that Limerick could be held. He called a meeting of the Irish staff officers and waved a piece of paper in their faces. It was, he said, a declaration signed by some of the most senior personnel stating that Limerick could not withstand a siege for longer than three or four days. We do not know who exactly signed this document, save Lauzen, some of the French officers, and one or two of the Irish commanders. It provoked an uproar. Most of those present spoke angrily against the document and insisted that Limerick could and should be defended, and would countenance no parlay with the Prince of Orange. The leader of this die-hard faction was Patrick Sarsfield, who asserted himself for the first time as a man with a following. From this time until the end of the war he exercised great influence on Jacobite counsels.
It is difficult to establish what type of man Sarsfield was. He never held an independent command and his military achievements are not unqualified. Yet most people, including the English, held him in awe. According to the Duke of Berwick (King James’ illegitimate son by Arabella Churchill), who married his widow, ‘he was a man of amazing stature, utterly void of sense, very good natured and very brave’. He was born at Lucan, County Dublin, around 1650, and was descended, on his father’s side, from an Old English family. His mother was Annie O’More, a daughter of the famed Rory O’More, one of the leaders of the 1641 rebellion. The O’Mores traced their ancestry back to the Milesians and from their seat in County Laois rose in rebellion nineteen times against the Tudors. As a young man Sarsfield was a bit of a tearaway. He was involved in a series of duels and took part in the violent abduction of two wealthy young widows. His military career was initially unpromising and on one occasion he was actually turfed out of the army. He was a convinced Jacobite and served as a volunteer against Monmouth at Sedgemoor, where he was seriously wounded. In the dispute with Tyrconnel he appears to have asserted the forceful side of his character. The viceroy was no shrinking violet himself, yet he yielded to Sarsfield and his associates.

Jacobite resources modest

It was at this time that Bosselleau was appointed governor of Limerick and took command of the garrison. His resources can only be described as modest. He had one regiment of cavalry (which was acknowledged to be of a high standard), one regiment of dragoons, and twenty-eight battalions of infantry. In total, the garrison amounted to about 14,000 men, but many were badly armed. MacMahon’s regiment, for instance, had no weapons at all. In contrast, William (at this time approaching from the direction of Carrick-on Suir) had 25,000 seasoned and well-disciplined troops. His numbers were, however, not as great as expected. Some men had returned to England in the emergency which followed Beachy Head others had been left to garrison Dublin and the minor posts which had been taken as the Williamites marched south.
Shrewd observers must have seen the defiance of the die-hards as starry-eyed. No betting man would have wagered on Limerick holding out against the power of William. Plainly, Limerick’s salvation (in the absence of French help) could only be found in a diversion or a stunt of some sort. A number of stratagems were thus hatched. Berwick suggested that he should be allowed to use the cavalry to raid the enemy’s lines of communication with a view to cutting them off from Dublin. Tyrconnell thought the idea too venturesome and it was dropped.
On 7 August 1690 William’s army reached Caherconlish about eight miles south-east of Limerick and set up camp. Next morning, at cockcrow, he reconnoitred the city and held a meeting of his high command. Just after noon he sent a trumpeter forward to summon the garrison to surrender. He got no reply, and repeated the exercise a few hours later. This time, all he received was a curt refusal.

William without heavy cannon

The next day began dull and cloudy. A thick mist lay on the Clare hills and fog rose from the River Shannon. As the day progressed the sun broke through and the heat became intense. William instructed that the city be invested and the siege began. But, in truth, he was in a predicament: all he had were light field guns and these were inadequate for the task in hand. He knew, however, that eight heavy cannon would be with him in a matter of days, as his munitions train (or siege train, as it was called) was following slowly behind the main army, and had reached Cashel. Within the week he would be able to level the walls of Limerick.
William did not, however, anticipate the next event. A Huguenot deserter stole into Limerick and spilt the beans about the siege train and even pinpointed its location. This was the act of Providence which the die-hards had prayed for, and Sarsfield saw his opportunity. He renewed Berwick’s request in a more modest form, urging that he should take a troop of cavalry and ambush the siege train before it reached William. This time Tyrconnell did not demur and the audacious Sarsfield sprung into action.

Sarsfield’s ride

At midnight on 9 August, Sarsfield and a company of horse slipped out of Limerick by the north gate. They made for the main cavalry camp at Clare Castle on the Galway road and increased their numbers these were augmented further by horse relieved from guarding the Shannon ford at Annaghbeg. Then, 500-strong, they followed the west bank of the Shannon, past Bridgetown, Ballycorney, and on to Killaloe where he turned left and followed the river upstream to Ballyvalley here, he crossed at a ford into County Tipperary. Ahead of him went a quota of scouts to keep an eye out for enemy cavalry and to monitor the progress of the siege train. Sarsfield himself was guided by a man of noted reputation, the raparee Michael ‘Galloping’ Hogan, from the parish of Doon, at the foot of the Slieve Phelims in East Limerick.

Under the guidance of this expert pilot Sarsfield’s party climbed over the edge of the Silvermine Mountains, went down the west side of Keeper Hill and on through Ballyhuorigan Wood. All movement had to be made by night there were a number of Protestant estates throughout the area, and their owners were not unlikely to be Williamite sympathisers. Indeed, unbeknown to him, hostile eyes had already spotted Sarsfield. As his 500 horsemen galloped down a laneway near the old twelfth-century cathedral of St Flannan at Killaloe, they were espied by a local Protestant landowner named Manus O’Brien and his colleague Mr Bevin. The onlookers quickly put two and two together.
On Monday morning 11 August, O’Brien and Bevin turned up at William’s camp and told their story. Initially they were unheeded, but O’Brien was insistent and eventually was interviewed by Willem Bentinck, the Duke of Portland, William’s life-long friend. Portland immediately sent a troop to Killaloe to have the story checked out. They returned and confirmed that a number of people had sighted the Jacobites. A report was sent to William, who was busy conducting the siege. He immediately recognised the danger and instructed that two companies of troops be sent out: one to strengthen the escort on the siege train, and the other to locate the whereabouts of Sarsfield. Portland passed these instructions on to Sir John Lanier, but Lanier was lackadaisical in dealing with them both troops did not saddle up for several hours.
In the meantime Sarsfield was lying low in the vicinity of Glencar, having made his way through Toor, Knockfine and Rearcross. From Glengar he could see right across the Mulkear Valley almost as far as the Galtee Mountains. His scouts had no difficulty in tracking down the siege train. It was snaking its way along the low country, stretching for two miles, enveloped in a permanent cloud of dust. As the day wore on it meandered through the village of Cullen, its wagon master, Willem Meesters, and his commander, Captain Thomas Poultney, unaware that their every move was being watched at its front and rear it had a small cavalry escort under Colonel Edward Villiers.

‘Sarsfield surprises the Williamite siege train, 11th August, 1690′.

The author beside the plaque unveiled at Ballyneety by President

At dusk the siege train turned off the road and wound its way into a meadow, halting near a large conical rock a few hundred yards from Ballyneety Castle. In County Limerick there are two places called Ballyneety, this one is in the parish of Templebraden, twelve miles south-east of the city. The wagoners lit their fires, took supper, and bedded down. Villiers’ cavalry was camped nearby, their horse champing the grass around them. Sentries were posted, a password arranged, and in a short while all was quiet. It was now that Sarsfield decided to strike. His men, in darkness, stole down from the hills, passed the graveyard at Toem, and then went down by Clonbrick and on to Monard. In this locality Hogan met an old woman he knew she had been selling apples in the Williamite camp and had learnt the password. It was Sarsfield’s own surname.

‘Sarsfield’s the word, Sarsfield’s the man!’

Around midnight Sarsfield approached the camp. No attack was expected and it was lightly guarded. As the horsemen stole up a sentry was alerted by the undeadened hoofs and challenged: ‘Who goes there?’ At this, Sarsfield sprang out, his horse rearing and answered: ‘Sarsfield is the word, and Patrick Sarsfield is the man.’ In a flash the intruders overwhelmed the stupefied guards. Standing on their stirrups, they galloped through the camp, cutting down, right and left the half-awakened troopers. There was bedlam as the Jacobites wheeled their horses again and again. Dozens of Orange soldiers were killed and the rest ran like hares in all directions. In the heat of the fray a number of non-combatants, some of whom were women, fell victims to the onslaught. This was a serious blemish on an otherwise daringly executed operation.
Sarsfield must have been pleased with his booty. The siege train contained six twenty-four-pounder cannon two eighteen-pounders eight brass ordinances of eighteen inches 800 balls 120 barrels of powder 1,600 barrels of match 500 hand grenades and numerous other munitions. In all there was 153 wagons (drawn by 400 draft horses). Sarsfield instructed that everything be burnt. The cannons were stuffed with powder and their long barrels stuck into the ground. All the carts, shells, powder, and other explosive material was heaped in a circle and a powder trail laid to the end of the meadow. One eyewitness account says that Galloping Hogan was given the honour of lighting the fuse. The powder track spluttered and the flame raced towards the huge mound of powder in the middle of the circle. Then the whole caboodle went sky high. The earth-shaking roar was reputed to be the loudest man-made sound ever heard in Ireland. The night sky went red and the glow could be seen in Limerick. Then there was quiet for several seconds. Next, came a different—crumbling—sound. The walls of nearby Ballyneety Castle—which two centuries earlier had been burnt by the great Earl of Kildare—were shaken by the explosion, and came crashing down.
Following the operation, Sarsfield and his men returned to base by a different route, and so avoided the Williamite force which had sought to intercept them. Lanier was five miles from Ballyneety when he heard the explosion. Realising that he was too late, he diverted to Killaloe in the hope of heading off Sarsfield. He hoped in vain.
When Colonel Albert Cunningham and a troop of Williamites reached Ballyneety at dawn, the burnt grass was still smouldering and pieces of wagon and other debris were scattered all around. The dead bodies, when counted, came to sixty. The number of woman and children among the deceased has always been disputed. Jacobite sources have insisted that they were few, and the Williamites have asserted the opposite. The truth will never be known. The destruction of the siege train was a severe blow to William, but six cannon were salvaged, and others were brought up from Waterford. With these, William began a fresh assault on Limerick in mid-August. For days the guns kept up a constant bombardment and a breech was made in the walls near St John’s gate. The Williamites stormed in and a murderous struggle went on for several hours. Men and women joined the Jacobite soldiers in the defence of the city. Finally, after suffering severe casualties, William withdrew his men. The weather broke and heavy rains caused much damage to his army, and a plague broke out. When his ammunition began to run short William decided to raise the siege. Shortly afterwards he returned to England.

Death of Sarsfield

The war continued until the Treaty of Limerick was signed in October 1691. But Galloping Hogan refused to accept the Treaty and carried on the struggle for a further six months. He left Ireland with the last contingent of the ‘Wild Geese’ to sail from Cork in late spring, 1692.

A portrait of a gentleman, possibly Patrick Sarsfield, attributed to John Riley. (National Gallery of Ireland)

Years later he ended his career as a senior officer in the Portuguese army. Sarsfield was fatally wounded while fighting for the French at the Battle of Landen in August 1693. He died a few days later at Huy, in the Austrian Netherlands. In Limerick, but elsewhere too, streets, municipal buildings and sporting teams are named after him. And a fine life-size statue of him stands in the grounds of St John’s Cathedral. Here he is in heroic pose, his left hand pointing towards the scene of his most famous victory: Ballyneety. To-day at Ballyneety one can still see the moonscape holes cut in the ground by the exploding cannon. In 1975 President Cearbhall Ó Dálaigh unveiled an attractive new monument on the site, and the Irish tricolour frequently flies from a flagpole on the conical rock.


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