No. 226 Squadron (RAF): Second World War

No. 226 Squadron (RAF): Second World War


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

No. 226 Squadron (RAF) during the Second World War

Aircraft - Locations - Group and Duty - Books

No. 226 Squadron began the war as part of the Advanced Air Striking Force, making it one of the first squadrons to be sent to France. The Fairey Battle suffered very heavy loses during the Battle of France. No.226 Squadron was forced to retreat west, and had to be evacuated from Brest in mid-June, reforming at RAF Sydenham in North Ireland.

In the spring of 1941 the squadron moved to East Anglia, and began a series of attacks on German occupied ports and shipping, swapping its Blenheims for Bostons in November 1941 and for Mitchells in May 1943.

In 1944 the squadron became part of the 2nd Tactical Air Force, operating in support of the Normandy invasions. As the Allies advanced towards Germany, the squadron moved to France, operating in support of the advancing armies to the end of the war.

Aircraft
October 1937-May 1941: Fairey Battle I
February-November 1941: Bristol Blenheim IV
November 1941-May 1943: Boston III and IIIA
May 1943-September 1945: North American Mitchell II
January-September 1945: North American Mitchell III

Location
16 April 1937-2 September 1939: Harwell
2 September 1939-16 May 1940: Reims/ Champagne
16 May-15 June 1940: Faux-Villecerf
15-16 June 1940: Artins
18-27 June 1940: Thirsk
27 June 1940-26 May 1941: Sydenham
26 May-9 December 1941: Wattisham
9 December 1941-13 February 1944: Swanton Morley
13 February-17 October 1944: Hartfordbridge
17 October 1944-22 April 1945: B.50 Vitry-en-Artois
22 April-20 September 1945: B.77 Gilze-Rijen

Squadron Codes: 226, MQ

Duty
26 September 1939: Bomber squadron with No.1 Group, 72 Wing, Advanced Air Striking Force

Books

Bookmark this page: Delicious Facebook StumbleUpon


Announcements

  • The Wartime Memories Project has been running for 21 years. If you would like to support us, a donation, no matter how small, would be much appreciated, annually we need to raise enough funds to pay for our web hosting and admin or this site will vanish from the web.
  • Looking for help with Family History Research? Please read our Family History FAQ's
  • The Wartime Memories Project is run by volunteers and this website is funded by donations from our visitors. If the information here has been helpful or you have enjoyed reaching the stories please conside making a donation, no matter how small, would be much appreciated, annually we need to raise enough funds to pay for our web hosting or this site will vanish from the web.

If you enjoy this site

please consider making a donation.

16th June 2021 - Please note we currently have a large backlog of submitted material, our volunteers are working through this as quickly as possible and all names, stories and photos will be added to the site. If you have already submitted a story to the site and your UID reference number is higher than 255865 your information is still in the queue, please do not resubmit without contacting us first.

We are now on Facebook. Like this page to receive our updates.

If you have a general question please post it on our Facebook page.


History [ edit | edit source ]

Special duties [ edit | edit source ]

No. 624 Squadron was formed by raising No. 1575 Flight RAF to squadron status at Blida in Algeria, North Africa on 20 June 1943. The squadron continued to carry out special duties operations formerly done by 1575 flight into Italy, Southern France, Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia. These operations included supply dropping and the insertion of agents to the resistance. For these duties the squadron operated at first with Lockheed Venturas and Handley Page Halifaxes, and later Short Stirling Mk.IVs. As a result of the allied advances in France and Italy, the need for 624 squadron in this role had declined and it was therefore disbanded on 5 September 1944. ΐ]

Mine spotting [ edit | edit source ]

No. 624 Squadron was reformed on 28 December 1944 at Grottaglie in Italy. Equipped with Walrus amphibians, it was now tasked with the role of mine-spotting along the Italian and Greek coasts. It had detachments and bases at Foggia, Hassani, Falconara, Rosignano, Treviso, Hal Far, Sedes [ citation needed ] and Littorio, until the squadron finally disbanded on 30 November 1945. Α]


History [ edit | edit source ]

No. 653 Squadron was formed at RAF Old Sarum, Wiltshire, on 20 June 1942. Β] In September 1942, the squadron was deployed to RAF Penshurst. Γ] The squadron relocated to Normandy on 27 June 1944, Δ] in support of the British Second Army and the Operation Overlord landings. Most of its pilots and observers came from the British Army, while maintenance was carried out by RAF personnel. The squadron moved with the Second Army through France and the Netherlands into Germany, and was disbanded at Hoya in Germany in September 1945, after the German surrender. Β]


World War II Database

Did you enjoy this photograph or find this photograph helpful? If so, please consider supporting us on Patreon. Even $1 per month will go a long way! Thank you.

Share this photograph with your friends:

Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Tony Curtis says:
6 Feb 2015 11:49:01 PM

The aircraft shown is ED989 DX-F and was my Grandfathers plane. If anyone has any further details on it I would love to know. It crashed whilst on the Peenumundee raid on 1718 Aug 1943.

2. Keith Mills says:
26 Oct 2020 02:26:18 PM

Frederick 3 carried the squadron code DX-F and was flown by the CO of 57 Squadron from Scampton and subsequently East Kirkby. Whilst the King did inspect 617 Squadron he also inspected 57 Squadron. The caption to this photo is incorrect, please amend it accordingly.

3. C. Peter Chen says:
28 Oct 2020 07:25:08 AM

Thank you for providing us the additional details on this royal visit, Keith Mills, we have updated the caption accordingly.

All visitor submitted comments are opinions of those making the submissions and do not reflect views of WW2DB.


World War II Database

Did you enjoy this photograph or find this photograph helpful? If so, please consider supporting us on Patreon. Even $1 per month will go a long way! Thank you.

Share this photograph with your friends:

  • » 1,102 biographies
  • » 334 events
  • » 38,814 timeline entries
  • » 1,144 ships
  • » 339 aircraft models
  • » 191 vehicle models
  • » 354 weapon models
  • » 120 historical documents
  • » 226 facilities
  • » 464 book reviews
  • » 27,600 photos
  • » 359 maps

"We no longer demand anything, we want war."

Joachim von Ribbentrop, German Foreign Minister, Aug 1939

The World War II Database is founded and managed by C. Peter Chen of Lava Development, LLC. The goal of this site is two fold. First, it is aiming to offer interesting and useful information about WW2. Second, it is to showcase Lava's technical capabilities.


World War II Database

Did you enjoy this photograph or find this photograph helpful? If so, please consider supporting us on Patreon. Even $1 per month will go a long way! Thank you.

Share this photograph with your friends:

  • » 1,102 biographies
  • » 334 events
  • » 38,814 timeline entries
  • » 1,144 ships
  • » 339 aircraft models
  • » 191 vehicle models
  • » 354 weapon models
  • » 120 historical documents
  • » 226 facilities
  • » 464 book reviews
  • » 27,600 photos
  • » 359 maps

"No bastard ever won a war by dying for his country. You win the war by making the other poor dumb bastard die for his country!"

George Patton, 31 May 1944

The World War II Database is founded and managed by C. Peter Chen of Lava Development, LLC. The goal of this site is two fold. First, it is aiming to offer interesting and useful information about WW2. Second, it is to showcase Lava's technical capabilities.


World War II Database

Did you enjoy this photograph or find this photograph helpful? If so, please consider supporting us on Patreon. Even $1 per month will go a long way! Thank you.

Share this photograph with your friends:

  • » 1,102 biographies
  • » 334 events
  • » 38,814 timeline entries
  • » 1,144 ships
  • » 339 aircraft models
  • » 191 vehicle models
  • » 354 weapon models
  • » 120 historical documents
  • » 226 facilities
  • » 464 book reviews
  • » 27,600 photos
  • » 359 maps

"You ask, what is our aim? I can answer in one word. It is victory. Victory at all costs. Victory in spite of all terrors. Victory, however long and hard the road may be, for without victory there is no survival."

The World War II Database is founded and managed by C. Peter Chen of Lava Development, LLC. The goal of this site is two fold. First, it is aiming to offer interesting and useful information about WW2. Second, it is to showcase Lava's technical capabilities.


Formatosi durante la prima guerra mondiale a Gosport il 1º marzo 1916 come squadron numero 45, l'unità fu equipaggiata per la prima volta con i Sopwith 1½ Strutter. Rischierato in Francia nell'ottobre dello stesso anno, lo Squadron si trovò a subire pesanti perdite a causa della qualità dei suoi velivoli fino a quando non passò sui Sopwith Camel a metà del 1917. Il No. 45 Squadron RFC ottiene alcune affermazioni con il seguente personale: l'asso britannico James Belgrave dal 7 febbraio 1917 vi consegue 6 vittorie fino al 27 maggio successivo, il britannico Geoffrey Hornblower Cock 13 vittorie dal 6 aprile 1917 al 22 luglio successivo, il britannico John Thompson Guy Murison 5 vittorie dal 6 aprile 1917 al 16 giugno successivo, lo scozzese Thomas M. Harries 6 vittorie dal 9 maggio 1917 al 7 luglio successivo, il canadese George Walker Blaiklock 5 vittorie dal 20 maggio 1917 al 22 luglio successivo e lo scozzese Matthew Frew 5 vittorie dal 5 giugno 1917 al 10 agosto successivo. Dal 24 agosto 1917 al 16 luglio 1918 era comandata dal Maggiore Awdry Vaucour.

Trasferito per via ferroviaria sul fronte austro-italiano alla fine del 1917 dopo la Conferenza di Rapallo a supporto dell'ulteriore invio di 3 divisioni di fanteria (5ª, 7ª e 48ª) e dell'XI Corps, il 45° squadron fu impegnato in attacchi a terra e pattugliamenti offensivi fino al settembre del 1918, quando ritornò in Francia. Dal 26 dicembre 1917 era a Fossalunga prima di andare all'Aeroporto di Istrana, dove si trovava nel mese di gennaio 1918 e dal marzo successivo al Campo di aviazione di Grossa di Gazzo con 18 Camel per altrettanti piloti alle dipendenze del 14° Wing di Sarcedo. Assegnato all'Independent Air Force, il 45 Squadron fornì una scorta ai bombardieri a lungo raggio fino alla fine della guerra.

Il 4 febbraio 1918 viene abbattuto sul Montello (colle) dall'Oberleutnant Josef Loeser della Jasta 39 il pilota canadese Donald Gordon Mc Lean di 18 anni che rimane ucciso. Nel corso della guerra, una trentina di assi dell'aviazione avevano prestato servizio nelle file della squadriglia incluso il futuro Vice maresciallo dell'aria Matthew Frew (23 successi di cui 8 in Italia), l'australiano Cedric Howell (19 vittorie), Geoffrey Hornblower Cock, l'australiano futuro Air Commodore Raymond Brownell (12 successi), John C. B. Firth (11 successi), Kenneth Barbour Montgomery (12 successi), il canadese Mansell Richard James (11 successi), Norman Macmillan, Peter Carpenter (24 vittorie), Richard Jeffries Dawes (9 vittorie di cui 8 in Italia), Norman Cyril Jones (9 vittorie), Ernest Masters (8 vittorie di cui 7 in Italia), Henry Moody (8 vittorie di cui 4 in Italia), il canadese Thomas F. Williams (14 vittorie), William Wright, James Dewhirst (7 vittorie di cui 6 in Italia), James Belgrave, Edward Clarke, Alfred Haines (6 vittorie tutte in Italia), Thomas M. Harries, Alan Rice-Oxley (6 vittorie), Earl Hand (5 vittorie di cui 4 in Italia), Sir Arthur Harris, John Pinder, lo statunitense Charles Gray Catto (6 vittorie tutte in Italia), il sudafricano futuro Group Captain Sidney Cottle (13 vittorie), Francis Stephen Bowles (5 vittorie tutte in Italia), Jack Escott Child (5 vittorie di cui 2 in Italia) ed Awdry Vaucour (7 vittorie di cui 4 in Italia).

Nel 1919 lo squadron tornò in Inghilterra e si sciolse. Nell'aprile del 1921 si riformò a Helwan in Egitto. Utilizzava i Vickers Vernon per bombardamento/trasporto, l'unità forniva trasporto di truppe, supporto a terra e servizi postali in tutto il Medio Oriente, in particolare a sostegno delle operazioni anti-ribelli in Iraq e Palestina. Dal 20 novembre 1922 al 14 ottobre 1924 era al comando di Arthur Harris. Durante la metà della guerra, l'unità passò sugli Airco DH.9A (1927), sui Fairey III (1929) e poi a una combinazione di Hawker Hart, Vickers Vildebeest e Fairey Gordon (1935).

Ad un certo punto l'unità ha adottato il soprannome "The Flying Camels". Il simbolo dello Squadron è un cammello alato, approvato da re Edoardo VIII del Regno Unito nell'ottobre del 1936. Il distintivo ed il soprannome derivano dal Sopwith usato dall'unità nella prima guerra mondiale e dal suo lungo servizio in Medio Oriente.

All'inizio della Seconda Guerra Mondiale, il 45 Squadron si convertì sui Bristol Blenheim e viene inviato a Fuka (Aeroporto militare di Sidi Haneish). Dalla metà del 1940 partecipò alla Campagna del Nordafrica e l'11 giugno fu uno dei tre squadron che parteciparono al primo attacco degli Alleati alla base della Regia Aeronautica ad El-Adem nella Base aerea Gamal Abd el-Nasser: 18 aerei italiani furono distrutti o danneggiati a terra, con la perdita di tre aerei britannici. Il giorno seguente, lo squadron partecipò a un attacco alla spedizione a Tobruch, danneggiando il San Giorgio (incrociatore).

Alla fine del 1940 lo squadron sostenne le forze di terra alleate nella Campagna dell'Africa Orientale Italiana, mentre era a Gura (Eritrea) in Eritrea. Durante la sua permanenza a Gura, lo squadron subì delle perdite: il 2 ottobre due Blenheim furono abbattuti da un asso italiano, il sergente maggiore Luigi Baron tra i membri dell'equipaggio ucciso c'era il CO del 45 Squadron, Sqn Ldr John Dallamore. Il suo successore fu lo Sqn Ldr Patrick Troughton-Smith.

Dopo essere tornato in Nord Africa, lo squadron operò contro le forze italiane e tedesche in Libia, Egitto e nel Mediterraneo.

Dalla metà del 1942 l'unità fu dispiegata nella Campagna della Birmania per il servizio contro i giapponesi. Tre aerei dello Squadron hanno partecipato al primo bombardamento alleato contro Bangkok. Durante il suo periodo in India ed in Birmania, il 45 squadron si convertì sui bombardieri in picchiata Vultee A-31 Vengeance seguiti dai de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito.

Durante la seconda guerra mondiale, divenne una delle poche unità alleate ad aver ingaggiato forze tedesche, italiane, giapponesi e del Governo di Vichy. Il 45 Squadron comprendeva un numero significativo di personale della Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) e della Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF), che provenivano da un pool non ufficiale di equipaggi.

Dopo la seconda guerra mondiale, il 45 squadron prestò servizio nell'emergenza malese, dalla stazione RAF di Tenga sull'isola di Singapore. Lì l'unità si è impegnata in operazioni di attacco a terra contro i terroristi comunisti (CT) impegnati in un'insurrezione sostenuta dai cinesi. Le Operation Firedog sono durate 12 anni fino alla conclusione positiva della guerra. L'unità si è anche impegnata in operazioni per sedare disordini sulla costa del Sarawak nel Borneo settentrionale britannico durante questo periodo di tempo. Mentre operava in Malesia, l'unità inizialmente volava sui Bristol Beaufighter, per poi passare alla Bristol Brigand (1949/1950) e poi ai de Havilland DH.103 Hornet, de Havilland DH.112 Venom, de Havilland DH.100 Vampire ed English Electric Canberra. L'unità aveva anche aerei di servizio, tra cui il Bristol Buckmaster ed i T-6 Texan. I comandanti delle unità durante questo periodo includevano Sqdn. LDR. E. D. Crew che ha prestato servizio da una data incerta fino alla rotazione con lo Squadron Leader A. C. Blythe nel febbraio 1950. In seguito fu poi impiegata durante il conflitto in Corea durante i bombardamenti e gli attacchi aerei ravvicinati e le operazioni aviotrasportate.

Dopo essere stato equipaggiato con i Canberra B.15 nel 1962, lo squadron fu coinvolto nella Rivoluzione del Brunei e nel successivo Confronto con l'Indonesia fino alla sua risoluzione nel 1966. Lo squadron si sciolse nel febbraio 1970 dopo il ritiro del Regno Unito da Est di Suez.

Il 1º agosto 1972, lo squadron fu riformato alla RAF West Raynham, a 8,9 km a sud-ovest da Fakenham, equipaggiata con gli Hawker Hunter FGA.9, come unità di addestramento di attacco a terra. Lo squadron si sciolse nel luglio del 1976 alla RAF Wittering di Peterborough, dopo che questo ruolo venne assunto dal Tactical Weapons Unit.

Nel gennaio 1984, il numero di squadron n. 45 (Reserve) Squadron, fu assegnato al Panavia Tornado Weapons Conversion Unit (TWCU) della RAF Honington a 9,7 km a sud di Thetford. Come "Shadow Squadron" o riserva di guerra, il ruolo di guerra dello squadron era come unità pienamente operativa composta principalmente da istruttori, ed assegnato all'attacco e altri compiti da parte del Supreme Allied Commander Europe della NATO a sostegno delle forze terrestri sul continente per resistere all'assalto sovietico all'Europa occidentale, colpendo bersagli assegnati da SACEUR, oltre al campo di battaglia avanzato, in profondità nelle aree nemiche, prima con armi convenzionali e successivamente con armi nucleari tattiche nel caso che un conflitto arrivasse fino a quel livello. I ventisei velivoli Tornado dello squadron hanno ricevuto trentanove bombe nucleari WE.177, sebbene ogni Tornado fosse in grado di trasportare due armi. L'apparente discrepanza tra aeromobili e armi era dovuta al fatto che i pianificatori del personale della RAF si aspettavano che ci sarebbero stati aeromobili sufficienti a sopravvivere alla fase convenzionale per consegnare le scorte di armi nucleari a pieno titolo assegnate allo squadron.

Il 1º aprile 1992 l'unità è stata sciolta e il titolo TWCU è terminato, con il suo velivolo ed il personale che è diventato il No. 15 Squadron RAF, pur mantenendo lo stesso ruolo di addestramento.

Nel luglio 1992, l'identità dello squadrone n. 45 (R) fu ricreata ed adottata dal Multi-Engined Training Squadron (METS) dal No. 6 della FTS della RAF Finningley. Il nuovo 45 (R) Squadron si trasferì a RAF Cranwell, vicino a Sleaford, nell'ottobre del 1995, e nel 2003, sostituì il suo BAe Jetstream T.1 con i Beechcraft Super King Air dalla Serco Group. Poco dopo, il 45 (R) Squadron ricevette anche aerei King Air B200 GT con motori potenziati ed avionica avanzata per portare la formazione in linea con gli allievi che proseguivano su velivoli di prima linea come il C-17 Globemaster, Voyager e Atlas A400M.

Lo Squadron ora opera sotto il comando del No. 3 Flying Training School RAF e gestisce il corso Multi Engine Advanced Flying Training (MEAFT) per piloti, mentre contemporaneamente allena il personale di retroguardia NCA per ruoli ad ala fissa, rotante ed ISTAR della RAF. Gli allievi piloti intraprendono gli studi della Ground School prima di iniziare l'addestramento basato sul simulatore insieme al programma di volo. Attualmente lo Squadron gestisce una flotta mista di King Air B200 e King Air B200 GT, che normalmente vengono portati dagli allievi verso la fase avanzata del corso. Il corso n. 215 è stato il primo ad avere una coppia di allievi che hanno completato l'intero programma sul "GT", che è stata poi replicata per il corso n. 217. Nel 2017, il corso n. 226 è diventato l'ultimo corso GT.


Watch the video: 332nd Fighter Group - 49th Fighter Group u0026 No. 226 Squadron RAF